Zettelmarkup: Literal-like formatting

00001007040200 · Info · (manual) · #manual #zettelmarkup #zettelstore

There are some reasons to mark text that should be rendered as uninterpreted:

Literal text

Literal text somehow relates to verbatim blocks: their content should not be interpreted further, but may be rendered special. It is specified by two grave accent characters (“`”, U+0060), followed by the text, followed by again two grave accent characters, optionally followed by an attribute specification. Similar to the verbatim block, the literal element allows also a modifier letter grave accent (“ˋ”, U+02CB) as an alternative to the grave accent character1. However, all four characters must be the same.

The literal element supports the default attribute: when given, all spaces in the text are rendered in HTML as open box characters (“”, U+2423). The use of a generic attribute allwos to specify a (programming) language that controls syntax colouring when rendered in HTML.

If you want to specify a grave accent character in the text, either use modifier grave accent characters as delimiters for the element, or put a backslash character before the grave accent character you want to use inside the element. If you want to enter a backslash character, you need to enter two of these.

Examples:

Keyboard input

To mark text as input into a computer program, delimit your text with two plus sign characters (“+”, U+002B) on each side.

Example:

Attributes can be specified, the default attribute has the same semantic as for literal text.

Computer output

To mark text as output from a computer program, delimit your text with two equal sign characters (“=”, U+003D) on each side.

Examples:

Attributes can be specified, the default attribute has the same semantic as for literal text.

  1. On some devices, such as an iPhone / iPad, a grave accent character is harder to enter and is often confused with a modifier letter grave accent. ↩︎